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todayinhistory:

March 9th 1945: Bombing of Tokyo begins

On this day in 1945, the bombing of Tokyo by the United States Air Forces began; the raid is one of the most destructive in history. There had been raids by B-29 bombers since November 1944. The raid on the night of March 9th saw 334 B-29s take off in Operation Meetinghouse, with 279 of them dropping around 1,700 tons of bombs. 16 square miles of the Japanese capital were destroyed, around a million were left homeless and around 100,000 people died as a result of the firestorm. Tokyo saw many raids such as this, with over 50% of Tokyo being destroyed by the end of the Second World War. However the firebombing on the night of March 9/10th was the single deadliest air raid of the war; the immediate deaths were higher than seen at Dresden, Hiroshima or Nagasaki as single events.

"Killing Japanese didn’t bother me very much at that time… I suppose if I had lost the war, I would have been tried as a war criminal…. Every soldier thinks something of the moral aspects of what he is doing. But all war is immoral and if you let that bother you, you’re not a good soldier.
- Curtis LeMay, the American general behind the firebombing campaign


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"Big Brother isn’t watching. He’s singing and dancing. He’s pulling rabbits out of a hat. Big Brother’s busy holding your attention every moment you’re awake. He’s making sure you’re always distracted. He’s making sure you’re fully absorbed. He’s making sure your imagination withers. Until it’s as useful as your appendix. He’s making sure your attention is always filled. And this being fed, it’s worse than being watched. With the world always filling you, no one has to worry about what’s in your mind. With everyone’s imagination atrophied, no one will ever be a threat."

   — Chuck Palahniuk (via liberatingreality)


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"This is a diseased century."

   — Arthur Koestler, Darkness At Noon


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"Farewells can be shattering, but returns are surely worse. Solid flesh can never live up to the bright shadow cast by its absence. Time and distance blur the edges; then suddenly the beloved has arrived, and it’s noon with its merciless light, and every spot and pore and wrinkle and bristle stands clear."

   — Margaret Atwood, from The Blind Assassin  (via violentwavesofemotion)

(Source: hoomanao)


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cinque-del-mattino:

Almond Branches In Bloom, San Remy | Vincent Van Gogh

cinque-del-mattino:

Almond Branches In Bloom, San Remy | Vincent Van Gogh


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"There was no past, no future; merely the moment in its ring of light, and our bodies; and the inevitable climax, the ecstasy."

   — Virginia WoolfThe Waves (194)


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"'And you’ll always love me won’t you?'

‘Yes.’

‘And the rain won’t make any difference?’

‘No.’"

   — Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (via petrichour)

(Source: goodreads.com)